Feline urethral obstruction

Blocked Cats

Feline urethral obstruction (aka BLOCKED CATS!)

Many cat owners are unfortunately all too familiar with the disastrous and often fatal if nto treatead

condition known as Feline urethral obstruction.

Due to the long narrow tubing that male cats are endowed with they are unfortunately more prone to

developing urethral obstructions than female cats.

In addition to physical blockages with mucus, crystals, or other cells, blockage can occur due to spasms

or swelling of the urethral wall. There are many possibilities when it comes to the cause of the problem

and inflammatory, infectious, dietary, or nervous issues are all suspects.

Ultimately, painful, difficult, frequent urination result from this condition and the extra stress of pain

and cause the snowball of events to lead to an ever worsening, and potentially fatal condition. Often

underestimated, the importance of emptying the bladder is essential for more reasons than just the

physical implications of an ever filling bladder; eliminating toxins, various electrolytes, and other

molecules through the urine is so important that their build up can be quickly fatal!

If signs persist for any longer than 24 hours patients often become very sick and need emergency care.

A very low heart rate, cold temperature, and severe dehydration are common presenting symptoms

that in addition to various other abnormalities are corrected at the hospital.

In addition to intensive care provided through IV catheterization, urinary catheterization to remove the

blockage is essential. Once the blockage is removed there is a very high risk of re-obstructing as the

underlying cause has not been addressed AND the patient is usually quite unstable and IV fluid

treatment is essential. Thus, patients are hospitalized for usually 3-4 days with a urinary catheter, on IV

fluids and typically receiving a variety of pain medications as well as drugs to prevent spasms of a very sore urinary tract.

Moving forward from this traumatic incident is almost as important as the emergency care. Adjusting

cats onto an appropriate diet that allows dissolution of existing stones and prevention of more from

forming is the cornerstone of treatment. A variety of diets have been developed and most owners have

found a type that suits even the pickiest of felines. Basically, there is a complex relationship between the

ph, protein and various other dietary factors that have been designed to dissolve and prevent urinary

stones and crystals and stones. In addition, ensuring good hydration is important and so we often

recommend a wet diet. If crunchies are our only option adding tuna juice or other cat friendly flavorant

to the water is sometimes helpful.

Modifying the environment is also frequently a component of after care as well as prevention.

Please talk with your veterinarian about preventing this terrible condition, and if your cat presents with any of the mentioned signs call a veterinarian immediately.

Dr. Helene Childs

 

 

 

 

The internet can be a confusing place! Here are some resources and websites that are reliable. Despite this good information, every pet is unique so don’t hesitate to give us a call and talk to Dr. Childs to about any concerns your pet has.
Canine Immunization Information

Immunizing your dog is an important procedure that in most cases will provide protection against an illness that may be life threatening. In past years, veterinarians have followed the vaccine manufacturer’s guidelines and recommended annual revaccination for diseases that were felt to be a threat to our patients. Recent studies have shown that annual revaccination may not be necessary for some diseases because many dogs are protected for three years or longer when vaccinated. Although most dogs do not react adversely to vaccination, some have had allergic or other systemic reactions after receiving a vaccine. Rarely, the allergic reaction can be so profound that it may be life threatening. Certain immune mediated diseases such as hemolytic anemia (anemia caused by red blood cell destruction), thrombocytopenia (low blood platelet numbers), and polyarthritis (joint inflammation and pain) in dogs may be triggered by the body’s immune response to a vaccine.
Vaccinating your pet should not be taken lightly. Failure to vaccinate could result in your pet contracting a serious preventable disease. However, unnecessary vaccinations should be avoided. A decision to vaccinate should only come after your dog’s age and the risk of exposure to disease are considered by you and your veterinarian. Vaccinations given at the appropriate age and at the appropriate intervals will greatly benefit your pet and protect it against some life threatening diseases.
The following vaccines listed are considered “core” and “non-core” by the American Veterinary Medical Association, Texas Veterinary Medical Association, American Animal Hospital Association, and Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine. The University of California at Davis and North Carolina State University Colleges of Veterinary Medicine also recommend vaccine protocols that consider core and non-core vaccinations. All pets should receive core vaccinations with boosters at appropriate intervals to be determined by exposure risk related to your pet’s life style. Non-core vaccinations should not be used routinely and are only administered if your pet’s exposure risk warrants it.

Core vaccinations for dogs: Non-core vaccinations for dogs:

__Canine Distemper __Bordetella (Kennel Cough)

__Hepatitis (Adenovirus-2) __Lyme Disease

__Parainfluenza __Leptospirosis

__Parvovirus enteritis

__Rabies

Puppy vaccination series: Puppies receive a series of vaccinations at 3-4 weeks intervals in order to insure that they are developing a protective immune response on their own. Maternal antibodies derived from the first few days of milk while nursing their mother will give the puppy a temporary immunity that may interfere with development of a protective immune response to the vaccine. This temporary immunity when present will persist in some puppies for as long as 20 weeks.

 

Immunizing your dog is an important procedure that in most cases will provide protection against an illness that may be life threatening. In past years, veterinarians have followed the vaccine manufacturer’s guidelines and recommended annual revaccination for diseases that were felt to be a threat to our patients. Recent studies have shown that annual revaccination may not be necessary for some diseases because many dogs are protected for three years or longer when vaccinated. Although most dogs do not react adversely to vaccination, some have had allergic or other systemic reactions after receiving a vaccine. Rarely, the allergic reaction can be so profound that it may be life threatening. Certain immune mediated diseases such as hemolytic anemia (anemia caused by red blood cell destruction), thrombocytopenia (low blood platelet numbers), and polyarthritis (joint inflammation and pain) in dogs may be triggered by the body’s immune response to a vaccine.

Vaccinating your pet should not be taken lightly. Failure to vaccinate could result in your pet contracting a serious preventable disease. However, unnecessary vaccinations should be avoided. A decision to vaccinate should only come after your dog’s age and the risk of exposure to disease are considered by you and your veterinarian. Vaccinations given at the appropriate age and at the appropriate intervals will greatly benefit your pet and protect it against some life threatening diseases.

The following vaccines listed are considered “core” and “non-core” by the American Veterinary Medical Association, Texas Veterinary Medical Association, American Animal Hospital Association, and Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine. The University of California at Davis and North Carolina State University Colleges of Veterinary Medicine also recommend vaccine protocols that consider core and non-core vaccinations. All pets should receive core vaccinations with boosters at appropriate intervals to be determined by exposure risk related to your pet’s life style. Non-core vaccinations should not be used routinely and are only administered if your pet’s exposure risk warrants it.

Core vaccinations for dogs:

Canine Distemper
Hepatitis (Adenovirus-2)
Parainfluenza
Parvovirus enteritis
Rabies
Non-core vaccinations for dogs:

Bordetella (kennel cough)
Lyme Disease
Leptospirosis
Puppy vaccination series: Puppies receive a series of vaccinations at 3-4 weeks intervals in order to insure that they are developing a protective immune response on their own. Maternal antibodies derived from the first few days of milk while nursing their mother will give the puppy a temporary immunity that may interfere with development of a protective immune response to the vaccine. This temporary immunity when present will persist in some puppies for as long as 20 weeks.

As always, your pet is unique and our approach to their medical needs will be also. Please give us a call or ask us at your next appointment.

Dr. Childs

 
Allergies in pets
Coming soon!
Hypothyroidism
Coming soon!